Standardised vs Preferred Tools

During software development we use many tools such as the IDE, code coverage, static analysis and build tools. There exists many of these tools with each their advantages and disadvantages as well with differences regarding personal preference. Being able to work with tools you feel comfortable with is important for your efficiency. Because of this different people might prefer different tools, but how should this be handled when working in a team where having a uniform setup has its own advantages.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Should You Keep Additional Files In Your Repository

Every software developer should be familiar with some type of versioning system, be it git, Subversion, Mercurial or some other. The advantages offered by using such a system are plentiful, they are that vast that such a system is often also used for other types of documents, be it in a different format. Services such as Google Docs, OneDrive or Dropbox offer the exact same features because they have recognised that having a history of your documents goes way beyond source files.

So we all acknowledge that keeping your data in a versioning system is a good way, but this opens up a different question. How should you organise your documents? I don’t mean which folder hierarchy, which in itself is already a challenge, but I mean the actual location. It makes sense that you want to keep your files close together, but how do you categorise your documents? Based on topic, type, target audience?

Continue reading

C++ Pointers And Constant Object

One of my biggest remarks when working with Java the past few years was the lack of a strict immutability concept. The most you can do is declare your object to be final, which only prevents changing the object being pointed to and not any changes made to the object itself. I remembered that C++ offered a lot more opportunities for this and you could go crazy with the ‘const’ keyword.

However, during some quick investigation regarding this constant behaviour for the GroceriesInsight project, I discovered that I was a bit off with how C++ handles the constant behaviour of arguments passed to a function.

Continue reading

ObjectSavingFramework – Initial Version

As it goes with all software, initially you think you have it all figured out and it’s all clear, but as soon as you start writing it you realise there are a couple of things not as straight-forward as you would have liked. The implementation of the ObjectSavingFramework is no exception to this, even though it was designed to be a very simple application.

The first version only had to have 3 different concepts:

  • Objects: which contains other elements (potentially other objects).
  • Values: which just indicate a certain value.
  • References: pointers to objects.

The references are an important aspect to avoid infinite nesting, or object duplication. An object that contains another object will have to decide whether this object is private to him, or if it is shared. If it is a private object, the whole object needs to be written as a child element, if it is shared then the reference is required. It is however this reference concept that caused most of the problems.

Continue reading

ObjectSavingFramework – Concept

A common part of any application is to save data, altough there can be a big difference in the reason why you are saving data. Maybe it is just the output of the application which takes a certain input, processes it and writes some output again. But a lot of applications save data to have some kind of memory in case it is shut down, or in case of a failure. A lot of applications wouldn’t be thinkable without any way of storing data for later usage, even simple ones. I recently encountered this with the GroceriesInsight application, which currently doesn’t do much, but even then I already felt the pain of not being able to save the data.

Because of this saving data is a well known process that holds little secret. The first thing you would decide would be in what format you want to save your things, this can vary from a text format such as XML, JSON to a database. Once decided you will search for a library that makes it easy for you to write the data in a correct format. But then you are faced with how to get your data from the object to the library to save it, this problem will the be topic for this blog post.

Continue reading

GroceriesInsight – Products & Transactions

The first thing to add is of course a way to add products and transactions as these form the core of the application. With the initial version I am aiming for a very basic form which just allows storing and retrieving data.

With the initial implementation of the Product and Transaction done, I will briefly explain how everything went, the thought process behind it and what I already know must be added in the future.

Continue reading

GroceriesInsight – Introduction

In the past I tried to contribute to an open-source C++ project, mainly because I want to keep my knowledge of C++ up-to-date. However finding an interesting project has been tough, but eventually I did find one. However, as with all projects there is a quite a big learning curve to get involved. Due to my lack of time, this never really took of.

Recently I decided to start working an a personal project, as with all of these projects they arise from a feel of need. The application I will create has as main goal to keep track of expenses. There are probably a lot of other applications that can do this, but by doing it myself I will have more control over the features.

Continue reading